The Pit Boss

The American Pit Bull Terrier
 
HomeHome  FAQFAQ  SearchSearch  RegisterRegister  MemberlistMemberlist  UsergroupsUsergroups  Log in  

Share | 
 

 Coccidia (repost from Bully Pit World)

Go down 
AuthorMessage
schismatickennels
Charter Member
Charter Member


Number of posts : 799
Age : 38
Localisation : Tennessee
Registration date : 2006-11-09

PostSubject: Coccidia (repost from Bully Pit World)   Wed Jan 10, 2007 8:29 pm

What are coccidia?
Coccidia are small [url=]protozoans[/url] (one-celled organisms) that multiply in the intestinal tracts of dogs and cats, most commonly in puppies and kittens less than six months of age, in adult animals whose [url=]immune system[/url] is suppressed, or in animals who are stressed in other ways (e.g.; change in ownership, other disease present).

In dogs and cats, most coccidia are of the genus called Isospora. Isospora canis and I. ohioensis are the species most often encountered in dogs. Regardless of which species is present, we generally refer to the disease as coccidiosis. As a puppy ages, he tends to develop a natural [url=]immunity[/url] to the effects of coccidia. As an adult, he may carry coccidia in his intestines, and shed the [url=]cyst[/url] in the feces, but experience no ill effects.
How are coccidia transmitted?
A puppy is not born with the coccidia organisms in his intestine. However, once born, the puppy is frequently exposed to his mother's feces, and if the mother is [url=]shedding the infective cysts[/url] in her feces, then the young animals will likely ingest them and coccidia will develop within their intestines. Since young puppies, usually those less than six months of age, have no immunity to coccidia, the organisms reproduce in great numbers and parasitize the young animal's intestines. Oftentimes, this has severe effects.
From exposure to the coccidia in feces to the onset of the illness is about 13 days. Most puppies who are ill from coccidia are, therefore, two weeks of age and older. Although most infections are the result of spread from the mother, this is not always the case. Any infected puppy or kitten is contagious to other puppies or kittens. In breeding facilities, shelters, animal hospitals, etc., it is wise to isolate those infected from those that are not.
What are the symptoms of coccidiosis?
The primary sign of an animal suffering with coccidiosis is diarrhea. The diarrhea may be mild to severe depending on the level of infection. Blood and mucous may be present, especially in advanced cases. Severely affected animals may also vomit, lose their appetite, become dehydrated, and in some instances, die from the disease.
Most infected puppies encountered by the authors are in the four to twelve week age group. The possibility of coccidiosis should always be considered when a loose stool or diarrhea is encountered in this age group. A microscopic fecal exam by a veterinarian will detect the cysts confirming a diagnosis.
What are the risks?
Although many cases are mild, it is not uncommon to see severe, bloody diarrhea result in dehydration and even death. This is most common in animals who are ill or infected with other parasites, bacteria, or [url=]viruses[/url]. Coccidiosis is very contagious, especially among young puppies. Entire kennels may become contaminated, with puppies of many age groups simultaneously affected.
What is the treatment of coccidiosis?
It should be mentioned that stress plays a role in the development of coccidiosis. It is not uncommon for a seemingly healthy puppy to arrive at his new home and develop diarrhea several days later leading to a diagnosis of coccidia. If the puppy has been at the new home for less than thirteen days, then he had coccidia before he arrived. Remember, the incubation period (from exposure to illness) is about thirteen days. If the puppy has been with his new owner several weeks, then the exposure to coccidia most likely occurred after the animal arrived at the new home.
Fortunately, coccidiosis is treatable. Drugs such as sulfadimethoxine (Albon®) and trimethoprim-sulfadiazine (Tribrissen®) have been effective in the treatment and prevention of coccidia. Because these drugs do not kill the organisms, but rather inhibit their reproduction capabilities, elimination of coccidia from the intestine is not rapid. By stopping the ability of the protozoa to reproduce, time is allowed for the puppy's own immunity to develop and remove the organisms.
How is coccidiosis prevented or controlled?
Because coccidia is spread by the feces of [url=]carrier[/url] animals, it is very important to practice strict sanitation. All fecal material should be removed. Housing needs to be such that food and water cannot become contaminated with feces. Clean water should be provided at all times. Most disinfectants do not work well against coccidia; incineration of the feces, and steam cleaning, immersion in boiling water, or a 10% ammonia solution are the best methods to kill coccidia. Coccidia can withstand freezing.
Cockroaches and flies can mechanically carry coccidia from one place to another. Mice and other animals can ingest the coccidia and when killed and eaten by a dog, for instance, can infect the dog. Therefore, insect and rodent control is very important in preventing coccidiosis.
The coccidia species of dogs and cats do not infect humans.
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.schismatickennels.com
trejos kennels
Top Pit
Top Pit
avatar

Number of posts : 650
Age : 36
Localisation : Virgnia
Registration date : 2006-11-17

PostSubject: This   Wed Jan 10, 2007 11:34 pm

This I do know a little about when I first bought Tequilla , My daughter had a pet Rabbit at the time.. and you know how they are they crap every time the hop well she had the rabbit out one day and later I brought tequilla out and she found some pieces and ATE THEM!! any who she contracted cocida, and almost died... she was sooooo sick, needless to say I got rid of the rabbit the next day because I really thought I was being cautious but I don't know anyway.. she got better, and the rabbit was gone...But first hand I know what this can do to a dog..
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://trejoskennels.bravehost.com
schismatickennels
Charter Member
Charter Member


Number of posts : 799
Age : 38
Localisation : Tennessee
Registration date : 2006-11-09

PostSubject: Re: Coccidia (repost from Bully Pit World)   Thu Jan 11, 2007 2:43 am

Coccidia is cureable and treatable, BUT it can also be fatal if misdiagnosed or gone untreated. The symptoms don't always arise at the beginning of it, and your pup can actually be normal and then get sick all at once.

This is why we added the albon as a preventative, better safe than sorry, and if you begin your litters out with the albon, they more than likely don't get the coccidia and if they do, there's a big chance that their immune system will fight it and you'll never know it.
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.schismatickennels.com
trejos kennels
Top Pit
Top Pit
avatar

Number of posts : 650
Age : 36
Localisation : Virgnia
Registration date : 2006-11-17

PostSubject: yeah   Thu Jan 11, 2007 4:48 am

yeah tequilla was cured with Albon, she didget sick pretty fast .. thanksfully we have a great animal hospital with great vets here that took really good care of her, diagnosed it fast and took care of it fast, and she bounced back slowly but surley
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://trejoskennels.bravehost.com
APBT4ME
Charter Member
Charter Member
avatar

Number of posts : 1025
Age : 38
Localisation : Ohio
Registration date : 2006-11-08

PostSubject: Re: Coccidia (repost from Bully Pit World)   Thu Jan 11, 2007 11:24 am

These are very good threads your posting.
They are deffinitely things everyone should be aware of. Idea
Back to top Go down
View user profile
American
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Coccidia (repost from Bully Pit World)   Sat Jan 13, 2007 5:18 pm

I do know about this one....Its not so much bad for an adult dog as it is for a puppy...adult dogs immune system can handle it but puppies will get runny bloody stools and can lead to death. My husbands step son's pup got it, where he got I havent a clue. But a trip to the vets office took care of it. I think he had to take pills for 14 days.
Back to top Go down
redsky
Guest



PostSubject: Re: Coccidia (repost from Bully Pit World)   Sat Jan 13, 2007 7:05 pm

AmericanPitbull wrote:
I do know about this one....Its not so much bad for an adult dog as it is for a puppy...adult dogs immune system can handle it but puppies will get runny bloody stools and can lead to death. My husbands step son's pup got it, where he got I havent a clue. But a trip to the vets office took care of it. I think he had to take pills for 14 days.

This is bad for any dog Tina. Adults can handle it better but they all must be treated and adults can even get bloody stool and what not just so you know.
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Coccidia (repost from Bully Pit World)   

Back to top Go down
 
Coccidia (repost from Bully Pit World)
Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
The Pit Boss :: GENERAL TOPICS :: For our Pits Sake........Health Issues-
Jump to: